Chosen Fate

I hate how movies give me headaches and make me really tired. I had to stop an hour and a half into Captain America: the winter soldier. I’ll finish tomorrow or Tuesday. My family better not spoil it.

thegladuh:

At school you’re treated as a child and that’s it. On a film set you’re treated as an actor, as a better person, which sounds awful but it’s true. Teachers are a higher authority in some ways. But I like that because it grounds me and I like my friends because they don’t care and they know I’ve been filming and that’s it, they don’t care. And as soon as I start rambling on about it they tell me to shut up. And I like that because again that brings me back down and I don’t want to get too far out there.

thegladuh:

At school you’re treated as a child and that’s it. On a film set you’re treated as an actor, as a better person, which sounds awful but it’s true. Teachers are a higher authority in some ways. But I like that because it grounds me and I like my friends because they don’t care and they know I’ve been filming and that’s it, they don’t care. And as soon as I start rambling on about it they tell me to shut up. And I like that because again that brings me back down and I don’t want to get too far out there.

Am I the only one who inserts themselves into superhero movies. Like not as a main character, but a side one to help them train or just talk to them?

So I took one of those personality tests where you get one of the 16 personalities by letters. I got ISFJ.
And on the summary it said “ISFJ’s have excellent memories, not for random facts, but for things people they love do, say, etc. They are excellent giftgivers because of this and often put others first. They think that sometimes their actions are selfish when they’re actually being selfless.”
That really does describe me. Not all of the stuff does, but most does.

visualtraining:

the most unattractive quality to me in other people is constant belittling of what means a lot to others. being contrarian just to be contrarian. people who love to play devil’s advocate. a kind of smugness about everything. an air of being above everyone because you don’t care about anything deeply like the people you mock

yukim116:

princesses and princes

annoyinglittletwit:

eri-niichan:

sorry not sorry

Free! Iwatobi Drag Queens <3

Me: Wow, I have dozens of story ideas and I have no time to work on any of them.
New plot bunny: Hey there
Me: no
New plot bunny: *Proceeds to develop itself*
Me: NO
New plot bunny: *Camps out with the rest of the unwritten, unfinished stories*
Me: nOOOO
The Joys of Writing
Me: Yes, writing chapter 17 today! Let's do the thing!
Brain: *gives me a scene from second part of chapter*
Me: That's... Nice. But we should start at the beginning, right?
Brain: *gives me a really vivid scene for chapter 18*
Me: Yeah, you're not being helpful at all today, are you?
Brain: Nope.
Me: Brain, no...
Brain: Ehehehe...
mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

fieldbears:

I think every writer/artist has that one story/drawing that gets completely skipped over, and they’d never say it aloud, but inside they’re like

'fuck all y'all, that's one of the best things I've done'

plus one story/drawing that everyone loves

'really? that one?'

skellagirl:

If you think cats can’t love you as much as a dog then you’ve obviously never had one come lay beside you and purr while you’re in the middle of a crying fit

cockmeats:

be a pal and like people’s text posts. reblog their selfies. respond to their questions. even if you don’t know the answer and even if you’ve never really talked to them before. there’s nothing worse that feeling alone on a website where everyone promotes love and friendship.